6 Ways to Prevent Heat Exhaustion on the Worksite

July 13, 2015

Six Ways to Prevent Heat Illness and Heat Exhaustion on the Worksite

Workers, especially those that work outside, are at a higher risk for heat illness and exhaustion during the summer months. Proper hydration, rest, and some other preventive measures will keep you safe while on the job. Check out our tips to keep safe while soaking up the sun:

 

1.

Remember: Water. Rest. Shade.

The recommended daily intake of water is 13 cups for men and 9 cups for women. Increasing water breaks and allowing appropriate rest in shaded areas will increase an employee’s performance. Drinking water can also help balance body fluids and help prevent muscle fatigue.

 

2.

Ease into the first days of work in the heat

Those who are new to working in the heat, or unadjusted to it’s effects, can be the most vulnerable to heat stress and should ease their way into working in the heat. This also applies to those who are returning to work after being off for week or more.

 

3.

Keep an eye on your fellow workers

Workers should work as a team to be alert in the workplace. OSHA has revised their Heat Safety Tool app to allow workers to calculate the heat index level and determine what their heat illness risk levels are. The app provides workers with information on how to monitor themselves and their coworkers for heat illness symptoms.

 

4.

Wear a hat and light colored clothing

Wearing a hat can help protect your scalp and neck from harsh UV rays and help provide relief from the sun. Light colored clothing will attract less heat from the sun and help keep your body temperature down.

 

5.

Rest in the shade to cool down

Workers should have access to at least 5 minutes of resting in the shade every hour. In South Alabama, one of the hottest areas in the U.S., resting in the shade can dramatically lower the heat impact on your body.

 

6.

Drink water every 15 minutes, even if you not thirsty

It is mandatory to provide employees with safe and clean drinking water. Even if you’re not thirsty, drinking water can help balance body fluids and prevent muscle fatigue. Water is essential to survival. Whether in an office setting or outdoors, water consumption is beneficial to all employees.

 

 

We cannot stress enough the dangers of heat in the workplace. Please take every precaution to keep you and your co-workers safe in the heat. If you need immediate assistance with heat illness or exhaustion please contact us at 251.436.8039 or visit occupationalhc.com. Let’s stay hydrated this year and avoid getting burned by the heat.

 

 

We have two OHC clinics to serve you:

MOBILE CLINIC

DIRECT: 251.436.8039
CELL: 251.751.9282
OFFICE: 251.434.6770
EMAIL: ddaniel@occupationalhc.com

PASCAGOULA CLINIC
OFFICE: (228) 762-4642 or (228) 762-4OHC
EMAIL: ddaniel@occupationalhc.com

 

OHC Website

 

OHC Facebook

 

OHC Twitter

 

OHC Google+

 

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

Resources:

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html?utm_source=Twitter

http://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/12331-osha-revises-app-to-help-workers-avoid-heat-illnesss

http://ohsonline.com/articles/2015/06/01/teaming-up-against-heat-hazards.aspx

 

Contact Numbers

Mobile: 251.434.6770
Pascagoula: 228.762.4642
HWY 43: 251.265.1215

Mobile & Pascagoula Office Hours

Monday - Friday:
7:30AM - 5:00PM

HWY 43 Office Hours

Monday - Friday:
8AM - 4:30PM
locations